Renovation of a Mediterranean Dwarf Palm (Chamaerops humilis) Part 2

Giving an overgrown dwarf palm time and space to grow back.

AAt the beginning of this week I described how you go about renovating a Mediterranean dwarf palm. Not only was the specimen heavily overgrown, it was (and probably still is) also severely infested by the Paysandisia archon palmmoth. Today I’ll show you how I attacked the rest of this renovation job. Due to the unusual rainy and cold weather we are currently experiencing on the French Riviera this February, I was not able to apply the nematode liquid yet, because it would be ineffective under these conditions, mostly due to the cold. In a week’s or two week’s time this should be possible to do.

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Renovation of a Mediterranean Dwarf Palm (Chamaerops humilis) Part 1

How to turn an overgrown dwarf palm into a garden highlight.

Chamaerops humilis before renovation

CChamaerops humilis is one of the most popular palms used as an ornamental feature in Mediterranean gardens. While it has decorative (and practical) advantages for a use in classic Mediterranean garden designs, it is also highly susceptible to both, neglect and an infestation by the larvae of Paysandisia archon, the now notorious palm moth. (I have previously published posts in this French Riviera Garden blog and elsewhere, that describe how to try dealing with a paysandisia infection.)
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Harvest Moon

Regain your childhood’s fun and treat yourself to a small herb and fruit-and-veg garden.

IIn my childhood, not only my parents, but also all my aunts and uncles grew fruit and veg in their gardens. I wasn’t that much into the veggies as a child, but cherries, strawberries, raspberries and pears were my favorites. It was magic: eating fruits directly from shrubs and trees, adorning yourself with “cherry-earrings”, pulling panicles of redcurrants through your teeth, making funny faces when eating unripe gooseberries and quickly throwing wormy plums over into the neighbor’s garden.

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Spring clean. In the garden!

Prune your plants now and you will enjoy a beautiful garden this summer.

TThe winter on the Côte d’Azur, that, a hundred years ago, attracted the rich and famous from London, Berlin and Paris in droves, lures with many serene days and mild temperatures, usually between 12 and 16 degrees. On windless sunny days, you might start sweating while strolling on the Rue d’Antibes in Cannes, the déjeuner outside puts a fresh tan on your face and in the garden of the beloved holiday home suddenly everything grows uncontrollably. And here’s the problem, which is, in fact, not really one, but to this we’ll be getting later.

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